luggage

It’s ironic that you need to keep hydrated while on a trek, cycle ride, motorcycle ride, water sport activity, expedition etc., but at the same time keep your body and your belongings/equipment protected from any external water penetration; so that they are ready for use and you don’t fall prey to any high altitude and cold sicknesses. To avoid this it is important to be aware of the difference between the terms Waterproof and Water Resistant and select your gear accordingly. It is important to be aware of exactly to what degree your gear can protect you from rain, dew, shower or any water body during your adventure.

Water Proof vs. Water Resistant: What’s the Difference?

It’s ironic that you need to keep hydrated while on a trek, cycle ride, motorcycle ride, water sport activity, expedition etc., but at the same time keep your body and your belongings / equipment protected from any external water penetration; so that they are ready for use and you don’t fall prey to any high altitude and cold sicknesses. To avoid this it is important to be aware of the difference between the terms ‘Waterproof’ and ‘Water Resistant’ and select your gear accordingly. It is important to be aware of exactly to what degree your gear can protect you from rain, dew, shower or any water body during your adventure.

Waterproof and water resistant – the moment you start shopping for monsoons, you’ll stumble across these two terms, be it electronics, rainwear, jackets, gloves, luggage, backpacks, sleeping bags, tents, watches or footwear.

Do they mean the same thing? Which one’s better? What’s the difference?

We at OTG are questioned about this difference quite often by our customers. We hope this blog clears the air for all readers and adventure enthusiasts, so that they can decide on the appropriate waterproof or water resistant gear for their use, according to their need in the outdoors.

Let’s look at the exact definitions.

Waterproof: Completely impervious to or impenetrable by water. That means the water cannot seep in through the stitches and zippers as well.

Water Resistant: Able to resist the penetration of water to a certain extent depending on the intensity of water droplets or shower.

In short, waterproof gear means no water can seep in, no matter what. On the other hand, water resistant gear will stop water to a certain extent, beyond which water will pass through.

But that’s really vague, isn’t it? You need to know the exact degree beyond which a particular piece of water resistant gear will fail, and you need to know this BEFORE making the purchase decision. You don’t want to find yourself in the middle of nowhere with gear that you bought to keep you or your stuff dry, falling short of the task.

Two different types of globally accepted rating scales are used for this purpose:

Ingress Protection Scale (IP Code): The IP code follows an international standard called IEC 60529 – Degrees of Protection Provided by Enclosures and it was developed by a technical committee of the International Electrotechnical Commission.

  • The IP Code classifies and rates the degrees of protection provided against the intrusion of solid objects, dust, accidental contact and water.
  • The scale takes into account three types of variables; the angle at which water hits the product being tested, the minimum duration for which the test must be conducted and the speed or force with which water hits the product.
  • The IP code is typically used for electronics, drybags, protective cases, etc.
  • The scale is measured from zero to eight, with IPX0 meaning no protection from water and IPX8 meaning protection against continual underwater immersion.

When buying gear that is certified under the IP code, you should look for the exact IP specification code on the packaging. Here’s what each of the codes in the IP system means in short.

The IP code follows an international standard called IEC 60529

 

Among the brands available on OutdoorTravelGear.com, Aquapac products are IP rated. The Packdivider DrySacks, Trailproof bags, Toccoa, Noatak and Stormproof bags from Aquapac have waterproofing rating of IPX6 , which indicates that these bags protect against powerful water jets / heavy seas / temporary flooding. These are great for heavy rains, but are not submersible. On the other hand, the Aquapac Whanganui cases have waterproofing rating of IPX8. This means that these are designed to not just keep out the rain but can also be submersed up to 30FT/10M under water for 30 minutes without any water ingress.

 

Hydrostatic Head:

  • Hydrostatic Head scale measures the degree to which a piece of gear can hold back water
  • Process: A patch of the material being tested is clamped at the bottom end of a clear transparent tube. The tube is then filled slowly with water. The idea is to see how high the column of water can get before the material lets water drip through.
  • The HH scale is typically used for fabric, tents, clothes, etc.
  • The scale is measured in thousands of mm. For eg., a Hydrostatic Head rating of 5000mm means that the column of water was 5 metres (5000mm) tall before the material leaked. The higher this number, the more protection a material provides against water.

(Source: bit.ly/GearWeAreHHRating)

1) Hydrostatic Head scale measures the degree to which a piece of gear can hold back water

 

In practicality, where you have water being pushed by wind and gravity against your gear, you will need a measurement of around 1000mm to resist light showers. Heavy rain and wind will create more pressure on your gear and it will require a higher rating of around 5000mm.

For really heavy-duty use, look for gear with a rating of about 10000mm. Gear with this level of rating should survive against water being pushed through by something physical, like a person or vegetation rubbing on it in the wind.

HH Rated Gear on OutdoorTravelGear.com

The Quechua Arpenaz 2 Tent has 2000mm PU-coated Polyester which means that the material can withstand pressure exerted up to 2 metres (2000mm) column of water without allowing any leakage.

The Quechua Rain Cut Jacket available with www.outdoortravelgear.com has an HH rating of 2000 mm.

Some brands may not quote the waterproofing standards for their products, but may advise you on the water resistance / waterproofing levels of the gear. It makes good sense to defer to the brand’s advise and use the gear accordingly.

For e.g. a number of brands selling motorcycle luggage in India provide rain covers for their luggage that are water resistant. Dirtsack offers the Gypsy with ‘water retardant’ fabric that wards off light showers coupled with an external rain cover making the bag resistant to showers. Dirtsack also offers the Frogman series of bags made from heavy duty PVC material that are 100% waterproof dustproof and rainproof.

The Hurricane Rain Overtrousers from Mototech are technical rain pants with fully seam sealed tapes and Hipora fabric which is waterproof and breathable. Mototech also offers the Hurricane Rain Jacket as a water proofing solution sold along with Contour Air Riding Jacket as one unit.

So what’s the moral of the story? Now that you know the difference, the next time you want to buy gear that is waterproof or water resistant, find out what it exactly means for that product and see if the product is specifically rated under any of the two scales we saw above.

Don’t let the rains keep you home. Go ahead. GET OUT!

www.OutdoorTravelGear.com
# OutdoorTravelGear #GetOut

Adventure Survival Kits – The why and how of it

Adventure Survival Kits – The Why and How of it!

There’s plenty of information on the web about survival kits and how to put one together. Chances are, if you’re reading this post, you’ve already read up on the basics – a fire starter, a utility knife etc. However, regardless of how well put together your kit may be, it is most likely that you’ve forgotten one big aspect – as an adventurer, you are choosing to put yourself in high-risk situations. Any pre-assembled survival kit you buy is likely to be based on a certain premise, for eg: you will be in a city, or that there will be search and rescue teams out looking for you (think natural disasters like the floods in Sri Nagar). But as an adventurer, a climber, a camper, a rider – these assumptions may not hold good at all, rather, they may even prove fatal! So here are some tips on how to put together an adventure survival kit – something every adventurer should do without fail.

  1. Think Big: Most survival kit tips out there tend to focus on making them small and handy. These are kits that focus on convenience and the fact that you’ll carry the kit around every day, in work situations etc. While a kit like that is also a good idea, you should definitely carry a larger one on your adventures. Don’t limit yourself by size. A medium-sized backpack is a fair starting point. It can be carried around on all your adventures, while also being large enough to accommodate some of the bigger necessities.
OutdoorTravelGear survival kit -02

While a small kit is handy for daily, regular use, one should definitely carry a larger, more extensive and purpose built survival kit when on an adventure trip.

  1. Think tools and gear: Being an adventurer will put you in high-risk situations fairly regularly. With this in mind, seasoned adventurers always carry along the tools of their choice and spare parts or gear as well. However, do consider if you are prepared for a true emergency. Before setting out, assess the risks objectively and pack for the maximum risk. For example, if you’re a cyclist setting out on a solo ride or a cycling expedition; objectively assess the chances of all possible high-risk situations. You’re likely to be carrying a puncture kit, but imagine you having a breakdown in a completely remote area with no mobile connectivity. What could have gone wrong with your cycle to make his happen? Pack accordingly. If you’re a motorcyclist, carry the exact fuses, spark plugs, a length of electric wire, and jump starter set. Campers, trekkers think about a fire starter kit, a spool of paracord, etc. Water sports athletes; don’t forget your dry bags, spare towel and a change of clothes. If you’re out rafting or kayaking in winter, also think about how you’ll keep yourself warm after getting wet.

    Think tools and gear: Being an adventurer will put you in high-risk situations fairly regularly. With this in mind, seasoned adventurers always carry along the tools of their choice and spare parts or gear as well. However, do consider if you are prepared for a true emergency. Before setting out, assess the risks objectively and pack for the maximum risk. For example, if you’re a cyclist setting out on a solo ride or a cycling expedition; objectively assess the chances of all possible high-risk situations. You’re likely to be carrying a puncture kit, but imagine you having a breakdown in a completely remote area with no mobile connectivity. What could have gone wrong with your cycle to make his happen? Pack accordingly. If you’re a motorcyclist, carry the exact fuses, spark plugs, a length of electric wire, and jump starter set. Campers, trekkers think about a fire starter kit, a spool of paracord, etc. Water sports athletes; don’t forget your dry bags, spare towel and a change of clothes. If you’re out rafting or kayaking in winter, also think about how you’ll keep yourself warm after getting wet.

    Always carry along the tools of your choice, spare parts as well as gear, and be ready and equipped for emergencies.

  1.  A multi-utility knife, basic medicines, a small torch, a fire starter kit and a length of strong rope are definitely important. But don’t forget to include some more stuff depending on your activity. For campers, include a large knife (or a weapon of some sort) for protection. For trekkers and hikers, an additional set of warm clothes can go a long way in case you’re forced to spend a night in the open. For motorcycle riders or cyclists, a small bag of mixed nuts and bolts, some super glue and zip ties (cable ties) will come very much in handy.
OutdoorTravelGear survival kit -03

Research on small tidbits you’re that’ll be specifically useful for your type of adventure in an emergency. With time and experience, you’ll have a holistic kit.

  1. Pay Heed to the Forces of Nature: Irrespective of what season it is, in a terrain like Ladakh, for example, the weather can be really unpredictable. Ask anyone who’s ever travelled there and they’ll tell you. So carry some rain protection, some cold protection and an extra pair of socks everywhere. You may also want to include a set of bandannas, scarves or simple large squares of cloth that you can use in multiple ways – for shade, for warmth, for protection against dust, and so on. In countries like India, it is also a good idea to carry along mosquito or insect repellent. As a last resort warming solution carry packets of Warmee. Warmee is a self heating pouch that keeps you warm for 8+ hours. You can use it under the outer shell of your clothing or in the sleeping bag at night. It is also handy for keeping the batteries of your cameras and other gadgets from draining out due to the cold.
  2. Food and Water: One of the big mistakes we make is tending to forget these two simple things. In India especially, we tend to operate under the assumption that food and water are easy to come by. Never start your adventure without planning for these two things. Getting stuck even for a few hours in North India in the summer will put your body under tremendous strain. Now multiply that by days, and it can quite easily prove fatal. You should carry at least 2 liters of water in your kit, and emergency food rations are a must. When packing food, make sure you pack high-energy bars, peanut bars and the likes, to give you a boost of energy. Remember, this ration of food and water should go into your adventure kit and are quite separate from the regular rations you will carry on your journey anyway. These are to be broken into only in case of a serious emergency. It’s also a good idea to keep dry fruits with you as they are nutritious and have a high content of iron and protein depending on the dry fruit, and perfect for emergency nutrition.

    OutdoorTravelGear survival kit -04

    How long you survive in an emergency is a direct function of how well stocked with food you are.

As you start gathering things together for the perfect adventure kit, you’ll be tempted to add more and more items to it. Our one bit of advice on this is to restrain you only in the case of really large or really heavy items. The trick is to have multi-purpose, multi-use items in there, and you’ll need to draw a fine line between what you can reasonably carry along, and what you’re likely to need. However, do remember that it is always better to be over prepared than under!

After you put your kit together, the key is to maintain it. Ideally, (and if you’re lucky), you’ll open this particular backpack only once every few months to replace your stores of food, medicines etc as they expire. Water will, of course, need to be replenished just before the start of your adventure. Make sure you check the items for damp, rust etc when you open the bag. It is also a good idea to make the bag itself waterproof. Invest in a waterproof bag or a dry bag, keep your adventure kit dry and snug, and step out confidently, ready to face anything that can be thrown at you!

If you’ve ever been in a situation and have had to use your survival kit, we’d love to hear your story in the comments below!

www.OutdoorTravelGear.com
# OutdoorTravelGear #GetOut #OTGadventure

OTG 5 Knots Every Traveller Must Know_Blog Cover

5 Knots Every Traveller Must Know

If you’ve done any kind of travel by yourself, then you know that skill, knowledge and resourcefulness are the three things that’ll pull you out of tight situations.

And the knowledge of these basic 5 knots will add to your skill-set, because these knots are simple to memorise, are versatile and can be used in a large variety of scenarios.

From securing luggage to rescue operations, knots are used everywhere. We recommend that you use this list of 5 basic knots as a starting point and then find out more knots that may be specifically useful in situations that you’re likely to face in your preferred mode of travel.

 

Clove Hitch

OTG 5 Knots Every Traveller Must Know_Clove Hitch_1

OTG 5 Knots Every Traveller Must Know_Clove Hitch

The clove hitch is a basic knot. It is primarily used for anchoring a rope to an object or an anchor; or to anchor an object to an anchor with the help of a rope. This knot is especially preferred when the object has a huge load bearing, as it is way easier to untie the Clove Hitch as compared to the Double Figure of 8.

To tie a clove hitch:

  • Pass the end of the rope around the anchor, and make a right hand loop
  • Continue over the standing end of the rope and around the pole a second time, this time making a left hand loop
  • Thread the end of the rope under itself (on the left of the standing end) and pull tight to form the clove hitch
  • Finish off with a thumb knot or the overhand knot

Tip: Though the clove hitch is a basic and versatile knot, be careful when using it. The clove hitch has a tendency to slip or bind if not finished off with a thumb knot (overhand knot).

 

Barrel Hitch

OTG 5 Knots Every Traveller Must Know_Barrel Hitch_2

OTG 5 Knots Every Traveller Must Know_Barrel Hitch

This is a very utilitarian knot. Typically, this knot is used to create a temporary carrying mechanism for an open liquid container, like a barrel of water. However, as you can see, one can use this knot for carrying or hanging any load that doesn’t have a handle of its own.

To tie a barrel hitch:

  • Lay an overhand knot on the floor.
  • Move the right-hand loop downwards and create a figure of 8 appearance
  • Place the barrel (or load) in the centre and tighten the knot such that the 2 outer loops tighten around the perimeter of the barrel
  • To secure the barrel, tie the 2 loose ends of the rope with a bowline knot
  • Finish off with a thumb or the overhand knot

 

Water Knot

OTG 5 Knots Every Traveller Must Know_Double Sheet Bend_4

OTG 5 Knots Every Traveller Must Know_Double Sheet Bend

The water knot is nothing but a variant of the overhand knot. This knot is ideal for joining 2 lengths of tapes or 2 ropes of the same diameter. It is sometimes also called a ring bend.

To tie a water knot:

  • Tie a overhand knot at the end of one of the ropes but don’t tighten it, keep it loose
  • Weave the other rope through the knot, following the flow of the rope, but in the reverse direction. (Start weaving the second rope, where the first rope ends and follow the path of the knot through to the other end)
  • Pull the two ropes tight
  • Finish off with a thumb knot or the overhand knot

 

Double Sheet Bend

OTG 5 Knots Every Traveller Must Know_Double Sheet Bend_4

OTG 5 Knots Every Traveller Must Know_Double Sheet Bend

The double sheet bend is a clever knot. It is the improved and safer version of the simple sheet bend, and we recommend using the double sheet bend whenever possible, instead of the simple sheet bend.

When using ropes, there’s often a need to join 2 ropes together, because a single length of rope is insufficient for the needed application. More often than not, the 2 ropes available are of different size (diameter). This is where the sheet bend comes in play.

To tie a sheet bend:

  • Form a bight (loop) in the thicker rope
  • Pass the thinner rope under the loop of the thicker rope, bring it over and then pass it behind the standing ends of the thinner rope, in that order
  • Tuck the thinner rope under itself twice to finish the knot
  • Finish off with a thumb or the overhand knot

Tip: Always start tying the double sheet bend with making the bight (loop) in the thicker rope and passing the thinner rope through it. This method has been tried over time and is proven to give the best results.

 

Bow Line

 

OTG 5 Knots Every Traveller Must Know_Bow Line_5

OTG 5 Knots Every Traveller Must Know_Bow Line

The bow line is one of the more complicated knots from this series, but if you learn it well, it can literally be a life saver. In the absence of a purpose built harness, a bow line knot can be repurposed as a harness. Apart from that, it can be used as a noose or generally as a fastening knot.

To tie a bow line:

  • Make a small full circle loop, with enough rope for the desired loop size
  • Pass the end of the rope through the loop
  • Continue by passing the end of the rope under the standing end and then bring it back through the small loop
  • Finish off with a thumb knot or the overhand knot

Tip: Always finish off a bow line knot with a thumb knot (overhand knot), for added measure of security.

 

 

Bonus Tip: Knot Dressing

Knot dressing is the process of arranging a knot in a manner that improves its performance. Crossing or uncrossing the rope in a specific way, depending on the knot, can increase the knot’s strength as well as reduce its jamming potential. Every knot needs to be dressed well and should look clean and neat for optimum performance of the knot.

So there it is! Our list of 5 knots that every traveler must know!

Make sure you know the knot in and out before using it in a real scenario. A knot tied the right way comes in handy, but a knot tied a wrong way can be dangerous!

www.OutdoorTravelGear.com
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OTG How to Pack a Backpack_Feature Image

How to pack your Backpack?!

Packing your backpack – How difficult can it be? We’re sure you’re asking yourselves right now whether you really need to know the RIGHT way to pack your backpack!

It IS pretty simple, but there is a technique to it. And once you get it right, you’ll notice the difference immediately!

A properly packed backpack, however heavy, will feel balanced and centered on your back. Nothing should be moving around inside and the weight needs to be evenly distributed.

Ideally, get acquainted with your backpack before leaving from home. Spread out everything you’ll be taking with you, use the right process to pack it and make a check list to ensure you haven’t forgotten anything.

When packing, we recommend using the following process. It is the most logical way to pack your backpack. The process focuses on optimizing the center of gravity of the backpack and ensures access to the most used items from your gear.

START PACKING FROM THE BOTTOM

Least Used Gear

OTG How to Pack a Backpack_Blog_Least Used Gear

Just like a building, a backpack packed with a solid sturdy foundation is a stable one.

Use the bottom of the backpack for gear that you won’t need throughout the day, till the time you camp at night.

Stash your sleeping bag, night clothes right at the bottom. If you’re going to be taking along items like an inflatable pillow, a sleeping bag liner etc., throw in those too at the bottom. If you use a carry mat that rolls up into a tiny shape that can fit into the bottom of your backpack, stuff that inside too.

Any other gear that you will need only after you’ve halted for the night, should go at the bottom, except for your torch or flashlight. Always keep your source of light handy and in a readily accessible place.

PACKING THE CORE

  1. Heavy Items
OTG How to Pack a Backpack_Blog_Heavy Items

So spend some time on this step and get it just right.

Usually, the items you place here will be things like rope, cookware, your food stash.

  1. Lighter Items
How to Pack a Backpack - Lighter Items

Next up, pack lighter and softer items around your heavy gear. This will make sure that the heavy gear is packed tightly and wont tumble around when you’re on the move. Use things like your clothes, jackets, tent body etc. for this purpose.

PACKING THE TOP AND PERIPHERY

Frequently Used Items

OTG How to Pack a Backpack_Blog_Frequently Used Items

Ideally liquids should be packed in external / side pockets to avoid any spills due to pressure of other items around it. If you’re carrying liquid fuel, to avoid a snafu in case of a spill, make sure the lid of the container is tightly secured.

Make use of daisy chains or loops on the exterior of your pack to attach gear that wont fit inside. There might be things like tent poles or carry mats, the dimensions of which are larger than those of your backpack. Take care to secure things tightly so they don’t snag on branches when you’re walking.

PRO TIPS

  • Try using pack dividers or smaller stuff sacks when packing things inside your backpack. This helps in dividing and better organizing your things and makes it easier to load and unload the backpack.
  • When stuffing gear at the bottom, make sure that it doesn’t catch on any aroma from your edibles. Also ensure against oil/liquid seeping into your sleeping bag, clothes etc. Not only will that spoil your gear, but it will also attract animals, insects at night; who’re very sensitive to smells. You don’t want them thinking you’re food!J
  • Always carry a rain cover for your backpack, even when you know it is not going to rain. A rain cover helps to protect the exterior of the backpack from the elements.
  • Know your weight carrying limit before you leave from home and make sure the weight of your backpack is a little lesser than that. If you have to buy some gear, food or other things during your trip, you don’t want your backpack to become heavier than what you can carry.

So that’s it then, the right way to pack your backpack! If you have some tips of your own that you picked up during your travels, then share them with us in the comments below.

Have an awesome adventure out there!

www.OutdoorTravelGear.com
#OutdoorTravelGear #GetOut #OTGadventure

Keep Your Stuff Dry With Aquapac Waterproof Bags and Cases

It’s not only your skin and hair that need care during the messy monsoon but so do your backpacks. Commuting in the rain can cause a mess of you and your bag. Not to forget the accessories and your vital electronic gadgets that cost you a fortune. Most of the time we buy the wrong backpack and spend a small fortune and most of these backpacks don’t even survive the rains.

Aquapac not only protects your gear against water but other elements like dust and sand and moisture. Aquapac products are made from 100% PVC-free material, mostly plastics which make them rustproof and surprisingly lightweight. These materials include TPU, ABS, nylon and polypropylene which are light and easily accessible.

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Aquapac gives us a fully-featured backpack which comes in 15L, 25L and 35L capacity and is ideal to commute, trek, camp or tour anywhere. The backpack also comes with an external mesh pocket to hold a 2L water bottle.

The bag is large enough to cart your laptop, camera, a small meal and a pair of clothes. The bag’s inbuilt partition allows one to store wet and dry clothing separately, hence the name Wet & Dry. Each strap of the bag comes with a lash tab which can be easily anchored almost anywhere. Aquapac supplies tested products which meet international waterproofing standards of up to 5metres under water. With a five year guarantee exclusive to animal attacks the bags can function at temperatures down to -40C.

Some additional features which no other bag except Aquapac offers, are as follows:
• Key pocket: The backpack comes with a key pocket so that you don’t have to dig inside the pack.
• Internal pockets in yellow: This helps to see the bottom of the bag easily.
• Reflective logo print: This helps you to be seen at night with reflective ink
• TPU-coated fabric with taped seams: Keep it in the rain for days and water won’t seep in through the seams
• Roll-seal: The roll seal is fantastically designed and can provide quick access to your belongings with ease, preventing water seepage.
• Removable back support/seat: This back support is removable and when wet can be dried and installed back without a struggle. Also the back support can be used to sit on anywhere in the wilderness.
• Sternum and waist straps: When you’re on the move the backpack securely remains in place. Moreover the waist straps can be removed if you don’t need them.
• External mesh-pockets: These pockets can be used to keep anything that’s the size of a bottle.
• Integral light-lash: you can add a light to your back which could come handy.

Now that we have found a solution for your bag and equipment, what about your mobile phone? It might stay safe in the backpack, but it would be a pain to halt and undo your bag to attend phones calls, take pictures etc. Aquapac also manufactures cases for handheld devices that prove to be lifesavers.

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The Aquapac mini and large cases are named after the Whanganui River in the North Island of New Zealand. They can be used to store mobile phones, Ipads, tablets, first aid and other travel essentials. These cases are ideal to protect your phone from dust, sand and water, moisture.

With these cases you won’t hesitate to remove your costly smartphone in the middle of a river jiggling to balance with butter fingers. You can simply slide your phone in one of these cases and use it without worrying about the weather. The Aquapac Mini Whanganui can fit your iPhone, blackberries, android phones and even your small gps units.

Besides the mini Aquapac also builds large Whanganui which offers more room to store and completely submersible. The case comes with an adjustable shoulder strap or which can be worn around your neck for added safety. The high frequency welded seams makes the case floats on water if you happen to drop. Whanganui are made from Polyurethane (PU) – 100% recyclable, thinner. This material stays flexible when it’s chilly, easier to operate equipment inside the cases. The clear material allows you to see everything that’s inside. The Aquapac comes along with ‘aquaclip’ which holds the bag together. It also consists of a spring loaded slider in the centre to adjust the length of the space available to put your stuff.

So there it is then. Equip yourself with the Aquapac waterproof backpack and phone case, and step out there with the confidence that your stuff is going to stay completely dry.

To see the complete range of Aquapac products available with Outdoor Travel Gear, visit http://www.outdoortravelgear.com/brand/aquapac

If you’ve used Aquapac products,we’d love to know your experience, in the comments below. Also, don’t hesitate to write in with your questions or enquiries.

http://www.OutdoorTravelGear.com

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