monsoon

It’s ironic that you need to keep hydrated while on a trek, cycle ride, motorcycle ride, water sport activity, expedition etc., but at the same time keep your body and your belongings/equipment protected from any external water penetration; so that they are ready for use and you don’t fall prey to any high altitude and cold sicknesses. To avoid this it is important to be aware of the difference between the terms Waterproof and Water Resistant and select your gear accordingly. It is important to be aware of exactly to what degree your gear can protect you from rain, dew, shower or any water body during your adventure.

Water Proof vs. Water Resistant: What’s the Difference?

It’s ironic that you need to keep hydrated while on a trek, cycle ride, motorcycle ride, water sport activity, expedition etc., but at the same time keep your body and your belongings / equipment protected from any external water penetration; so that they are ready for use and you don’t fall prey to any high altitude and cold sicknesses. To avoid this it is important to be aware of the difference between the terms ‘Waterproof’ and ‘Water Resistant’ and select your gear accordingly. It is important to be aware of exactly to what degree your gear can protect you from rain, dew, shower or any water body during your adventure.

Waterproof and water resistant – the moment you start shopping for monsoons, you’ll stumble across these two terms, be it electronics, rainwear, jackets, gloves, luggage, backpacks, sleeping bags, tents, watches or footwear.

Do they mean the same thing? Which one’s better? What’s the difference?

We at OTG are questioned about this difference quite often by our customers. We hope this blog clears the air for all readers and adventure enthusiasts, so that they can decide on the appropriate waterproof or water resistant gear for their use, according to their need in the outdoors.

Let’s look at the exact definitions.

Waterproof: Completely impervious to or impenetrable by water. That means the water cannot seep in through the stitches and zippers as well.

Water Resistant: Able to resist the penetration of water to a certain extent depending on the intensity of water droplets or shower.

In short, waterproof gear means no water can seep in, no matter what. On the other hand, water resistant gear will stop water to a certain extent, beyond which water will pass through.

But that’s really vague, isn’t it? You need to know the exact degree beyond which a particular piece of water resistant gear will fail, and you need to know this BEFORE making the purchase decision. You don’t want to find yourself in the middle of nowhere with gear that you bought to keep you or your stuff dry, falling short of the task.

Two different types of globally accepted rating scales are used for this purpose:

Ingress Protection Scale (IP Code): The IP code follows an international standard called IEC 60529 – Degrees of Protection Provided by Enclosures and it was developed by a technical committee of the International Electrotechnical Commission.

  • The IP Code classifies and rates the degrees of protection provided against the intrusion of solid objects, dust, accidental contact and water.
  • The scale takes into account three types of variables; the angle at which water hits the product being tested, the minimum duration for which the test must be conducted and the speed or force with which water hits the product.
  • The IP code is typically used for electronics, drybags, protective cases, etc.
  • The scale is measured from zero to eight, with IPX0 meaning no protection from water and IPX8 meaning protection against continual underwater immersion.

When buying gear that is certified under the IP code, you should look for the exact IP specification code on the packaging. Here’s what each of the codes in the IP system means in short.

The IP code follows an international standard called IEC 60529

 

Among the brands available on OutdoorTravelGear.com, Aquapac products are IP rated. The Packdivider DrySacks, Trailproof bags, Toccoa, Noatak and Stormproof bags from Aquapac have waterproofing rating of IPX6 , which indicates that these bags protect against powerful water jets / heavy seas / temporary flooding. These are great for heavy rains, but are not submersible. On the other hand, the Aquapac Whanganui cases have waterproofing rating of IPX8. This means that these are designed to not just keep out the rain but can also be submersed up to 30FT/10M under water for 30 minutes without any water ingress.

 

Hydrostatic Head:

  • Hydrostatic Head scale measures the degree to which a piece of gear can hold back water
  • Process: A patch of the material being tested is clamped at the bottom end of a clear transparent tube. The tube is then filled slowly with water. The idea is to see how high the column of water can get before the material lets water drip through.
  • The HH scale is typically used for fabric, tents, clothes, etc.
  • The scale is measured in thousands of mm. For eg., a Hydrostatic Head rating of 5000mm means that the column of water was 5 metres (5000mm) tall before the material leaked. The higher this number, the more protection a material provides against water.

(Source: bit.ly/GearWeAreHHRating)

1) Hydrostatic Head scale measures the degree to which a piece of gear can hold back water

 

In practicality, where you have water being pushed by wind and gravity against your gear, you will need a measurement of around 1000mm to resist light showers. Heavy rain and wind will create more pressure on your gear and it will require a higher rating of around 5000mm.

For really heavy-duty use, look for gear with a rating of about 10000mm. Gear with this level of rating should survive against water being pushed through by something physical, like a person or vegetation rubbing on it in the wind.

HH Rated Gear on OutdoorTravelGear.com

The Quechua Arpenaz 2 Tent has 2000mm PU-coated Polyester which means that the material can withstand pressure exerted up to 2 metres (2000mm) column of water without allowing any leakage.

The Quechua Rain Cut Jacket available with www.outdoortravelgear.com has an HH rating of 2000 mm.

Some brands may not quote the waterproofing standards for their products, but may advise you on the water resistance / waterproofing levels of the gear. It makes good sense to defer to the brand’s advise and use the gear accordingly.

For e.g. a number of brands selling motorcycle luggage in India provide rain covers for their luggage that are water resistant. Dirtsack offers the Gypsy with ‘water retardant’ fabric that wards off light showers coupled with an external rain cover making the bag resistant to showers. Dirtsack also offers the Frogman series of bags made from heavy duty PVC material that are 100% waterproof dustproof and rainproof.

The Hurricane Rain Overtrousers from Mototech are technical rain pants with fully seam sealed tapes and Hipora fabric which is waterproof and breathable. Mototech also offers the Hurricane Rain Jacket as a water proofing solution sold along with Contour Air Riding Jacket as one unit.

So what’s the moral of the story? Now that you know the difference, the next time you want to buy gear that is waterproof or water resistant, find out what it exactly means for that product and see if the product is specifically rated under any of the two scales we saw above.

Don’t let the rains keep you home. Go ahead. GET OUT!

www.OutdoorTravelGear.com
# OutdoorTravelGear #GetOut

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OTG: Tips and Tricks post: Gear Research Point Blog post_001

How To Do Research Before Buying Adventure Gear

“My budget is Rs. XXXX, which jacket will be perfect for me?”

“I want a waterproof bag, do you stock any?”

“I leave for a trek tomorrow, what should I take with me?”

Outdoor Travel Gear completed 10 years in 2015. Over the decade that we’ve been in business, we’ve been asked these and other similar questions, a countless number of times.

We don’t mind it when you ask us questions. On the contrary, we encourage every shopper to engage with us, in-store or online. That way we can be of best service to our customers’ needs.

More often than not, a buyer seems to have started his purchase process with either a specific product or a price point in mind. This reduces the options / choices that they would otherwise have had, and in that case, there’s a great chance that they end up with the wrong product.

From our experience, here’s our recommendation of the steps / process to follow and the research to be done before buying adventure gear, to ensure that the gear you end up buying is best suited for you.

  • Identify your need

Never start the process of gear purchase with a product in mind. Identify your need first. Contrary to popular belief, your need is not in terms of a product. Be aware of your need in terms of the utility that you want fulfilled.

For e.g., if you’re going on a himalayan adventure, you’ll need to stay warm and dry. If you’re getting into an action sport, you’ll need to stay safe while enjoying your sport. If you’re going camping overnight, you’ll need shelter and sleeping support.

  • Identify the features

Match your need with the features that will provide that utility. You shouldn’t be thinking in terms of a physical product yet. More than one type / category of products can fulfill your specific need. In listing the products, get as detailed as you can.

  • Understand jargon

In this decision making process, to make sure you end making the right purchase, it is very important to understand the jargon used for defining the features you want to understand.

For e.g., with the varied advanced methods of waterproofing available today, it isn’t enough for a brand to simply say that their product is waterproof. A product can be waterproofed up to various levels. The IPX grading system classifies these levels from IPX1 to IPX8, based on various parameters. The higher the number, the more waterproof that product is. In simplest terms, though an IPX1 rated product is waterproof, it is not submersible and the protection from water ingress lasts only for a short period of time. On the other hand, an IPX8 rated product can be submerged in water and remains waterproof for a long time. It thus becomes crucial to exactly specify your need and to match that need with the exact feature and degree of performance.

  • List the products

Prioritise the features you’ve identified. Mark them as “must-have”, “good-to-have” and “need-not-have”. Now find out products which are accessible to you and which match the list of features you’ve made.

  • Do your research

Most of the reviews are product oriented. So they’ll be of help to you only once you have arrived at the shortlist of products. Try to get your hand on comparative reviews. See online user reviews. Look for first impression reviews and long-term ownership reviews. Try searching for user videos.

But more than just that, talk to your friends, others who’re in the same sport/ adventure as you are in.Try talking with people who’ve been using the products you’ve shortlisted. Ask their opinion. Also find out the places that sell the gear you want to buy and go see the options available.

  • Project your usage

Think ahead and try to project how you’re going to use the gear. Be realistic about variables like frequency of use, seasons of use, ideal longevity, is this your first purchase in the category. Prioritize this list and keep it agnostic of budget.

For e.g.: Sleeping bags come in a wide variety of sizes, shapes, warming factor, etc. If you walk into a store without knowing exactly when, where and how often you are going to need to use the sleeping bag, you’ll end up buying the wrong one and might end up in a tight spot, somewhere in the middle of nowhere.

  • Make a shortlist

While shortlisting products, eliminate products from your original list that don’t meet your basic need criteria based on your online/offline research and understanding of the terminology.

  • Find parity and take your time

Now you have a shortlist of products. This is when you think about money for the first time. If any product is out of your range, but if it’s the perfect product for you, you should think of the following:

  1. How soon and urgently do you need the product.We repeat“NEED the product” and “Not WANT the product”.
  2. By how much can you stretch your budget.

Ideally, if you don’t need the product immediately, put aside the money you have and save up the difference and then go for the product. You’ll thank yourself for it later.

For e.g.: Let’s say you need to buy a helmet for motocross. Motocross is a high-risk sport. There really is no point in compromising on quality and your own safety, just because you can’t afford your ideal helmet. You might as well wait for a while, save up and then get that helmet.

Depending on the importance of the product vis-à-vis the sport / adventure that you are going to use it for, if needed, you may consider postponing your plans to get into that sport / adventure instead of using a sub-optimal product.

On the other hand, even if you can spend more than what the minimum required product costs, don’t overspend. Save the extra cash for a rainy day.

  • Be sure of size and fit

If you are sure about your size, shop online. Look for a sizing / fitting chart on the site where you’re shopping from. If this is your first purchase in the category and you want to shop online, be completely sure of the size and / or buy from a brick and mortar store.

If you are buying a motorcycle bag in a store, take your bike with you, if you are buying an overjacket, try it on with all the layers you’ll be wearing inside. If you’re buying an expedition pack, try it on for shoulder size and be completely sure that you can carry all that the bag can hold once it is completely loaded.

  • Caveat emptor (Let the Buyer Beware)

Anywhere you buy your gear from, online or offline, every brand is likely to have their own terms of guarantee / warrantee conditions. These conditions are set down by the manufacturing brand and followed by the reseller. The reseller typically cannot give warranty / guarantee if not supported by the brand.

Also, every reseller will have their own terms and conditions for incorrect size being bought, the customer not liking the product after making the purchase, defects in / after warranty period, etc.

Be apprised of these conditions before the purchase. Always carefully read the warranty, guarantee and returns procedures before purchasing online or in-store. Make sure none of the intrinsic terms of purchase are going to be a hurdle later on. If you are not able to get the complete return / warranty information from the website, then contact the seller through email, chat or phone and clear your doubts with specific questions.

  • Buy!

Go ahead and make that purchase confidently. You’ve done your research. You’ve deserved it!

 

We’ve really tried to detail out the purchase journey as we see it. Depending on your previous experiences, you may or may not go through all the steps individually. The basic idea here is to be aware of your specific need and the various ways in which it can be fulfilled.

Once you know exactly what gear you need, go ahead and buy it!

We love talking to our customers and sharing our experiences about the gear we sell. Do feel free to get in touch with us. You can:

Or, you can walk in to any one of our stores: https://www.outdoortravelgear.com/storelocator

Have a crazy adventure! And be safe out there!

www.OutdoorTravelGear.com
#OutdoorTravelGear #GetOut

Adventurers that inspire us at Outdoor Travel Gear

The adventure sports and travel community in India is still fairly small, but is very tight knit and is growing at a phenomenal speed! As adventurers in India, we’re lucky that wherever we are in the country, we have plenty to do and explore, always have a community we can draw on for help and support and to pursue our passion.

There are some crazy adrenaline junkies out there who’re expanding the boundaries of their sport and doing things that dreams are made of!

Here’s a list of adventurers that inspire us. We’re sure they’ll have the same effect on you too. Remember that while we’ve compiled this list with many parameters in mind, there are plenty of people out there who could possibly be on this but aren’t – mainly due to the fact that we simply didn’t have enough space for them all!

 Ishani Sawant (Mountaineer): OutdoorTravelGear.com had recently featured Ishani on our blog. For your daily dose of mountaineering, check out the Facebook page and website of Ishani Sawant – a 23 year old mountaineer from Pune. Her pictures faithfully record her daily moments, her mountaineering activities and her training, making it a fascinating and real portrayal of her life.

Ishani Sawant: FacebookInstagram – Twitter

 

 

 

Helmet Stories (Motorcycle Tourers): The dynamic duo of Harsh Man Rai and Vir Nakai has been inspiring riders for almost a generation through Helmet Stories. Started as a motorcycling touring company, their photos and videos of the mighty Himalayas are drool-worthy.

Helmet Stories: FacebookInstagram – Twitter

 

 

 

 

Abhijeet Singh (Adventurer): Now what can’t Abhijeet Singh do? Mountaineer, adventure photographer, acro-yogi calisthenics athlete, and filmmaker. Follow him for guaranteed daily dose of thrills!

Abhijeet Singh: Instagram 

 

 

 

Sumitra Senapaty (Traveler): Sumitra Senapaty started the truly inspirational WOW (Women on Wanderlust). A platform for women to get together and travel, WOW has been steadily increasing in popularity over the last year with women travellers. Follow the WOW page to get a gist of some exotic Indian and international destinations.

Women on Wanderlust : Facebook – Instagram Twitter
Sumitra Senapaty: Facebook Instagram

 

 

 

Shubham Dharmsktu (Cyclist): Shubham is an #OTGAthlete who set out on The Great Himalyan Cycle Trip. OTG sponsored gear for him that would help him on his journey – AQUAPAC Wet and Dry Waterproof Backpack – 25 Ltrs, AQUAPAC Small Bike-Mounted Waterproof Phone Case, Gerber Compact Multi-tool, QuipCo Dune Tube Future, QuipCo Tundra Fleece Balaclava. He is an avid traveler and cyclist is currently working on his sustainable tourism venture – all about travel, cycling, home-stays, local food etc. Check out OutdoorTravelGear.com’s feature blog on Shubham to know more about him.

Shubham Dharmsktu : Facebook

 

 

 

 

Andy Pariat (Travel Photographer): For a taste of Meghalaya that will come close to making you swoon, check out Andy Pariat’s photography covering that magical and under explored part of India.

Andy Pariat :  Facebook – Instagram

 

 

 

C S Santosh (Rally Raid Athlete): India’s Motocross Racing Champion. Unarguably India’s finest off-road racer. Enough said.

C S Santosh : Website– Facebook Instagram – Twitter 

 

 

 

H V Kumar (Explorer): With an encyclopedic knowledge of Indian roads, HV Kumar started up the HiVayKing Club, one of India’s most popular support groups on Facebook for travelers. His personal pages are also worth following simply for the number of people who are connected to him in some way or the other.

HiVayKing: Facebook
H V Kumar : Facebook Twitter


 

 

Abhinav Singhai (Travel Photographer): A travel photographer with a difference, Abhinav is intent on showing the world the beauty of the night sky.

Abhinav Singhai : Facebook Instagram –Twitter – Flickr

 

 

 

Shanu Babar (Travel Film-Maker): A film maker, editor and cinematographer -Shanu makes India come to life through a lens. His work is largely urban, and completely magical.

Shanu Babar : Facebook Instagram – Twitter

 

 

 

 

Swati Saxena (Explorer):If long distance walking is your thing, you can do no better than to follow Swati. An ex-accountant, she now ‘walks around the country’, and writes while she does it too. Her blog is full of helpful hints for those who want to explore on foot.

Swati Saxena : Blog – Instagram 

 

 

 

Jehan Driver (Kite surfer and Explorer)

Jehan is a kite-surfer – one of the few of his kind in India. He owns a travel and exploration brand – Quest Expeditions, which also undertakes training for water-sport activities like kite-surfing, kayaking, sailing and outdoors survival.

Jehan Driver : FacebookInstagram – Twitter

 

 

 

Rishad Bhumgara (Mad BawaMotorcyclist)

Rishad is a long distance rider who loves doing it the old school way. He successfully completed a solo ride from Mumbai to Myanmar and back; on his 30 years old Yezdi! Rishad has been a long standing customer with Outdoor Travel Gear and a dear friend. Recently, we had invited him to be a guest blogger for outdoortravelgearblog.wordpress.com. Check it out in our blog

Rishad Bhumgara : Website –Facebook – Instagram

 

 

 

Kaustubh Khade (Kayaker)

Kaustubh is on a kayaking journey for life discovering bits about this own self along the way. He’s been literally making ‘waves’ at international kayaking circuit. Kaustubh maintains a blog showcasing his escapades. A must follow for any one who has an adventurous streak.

Sagar and Pritesh from Outdoor Travel Gear met with Kaustubh in summers of 2015 and amongst other things, they discussed kayaking, water-sports and adventure – #OTGathletes – Paddle Hard with Kaustubh Khade

Kaustubh Khade : Facebook –Instagram – Twitter

 

There’s also much inspiration outside our borders. Here’s another (very short) list of people you should follow if international travel and adventure is your thing.

 


 

Brad Ringstmeier (World Traveler): An aerospace mechanic turned travel photographer, Brad has been on the road for a year and half with his venture Perpetual-Moto-Discovery – collecting adventures, stories, memories, goodwill and friends as fast as he can ride.

Brad Ringstmeier – Facebook – Instagram

 

 

 

Pete Mc Bride (Explorer): Pete Mc Bride is a film-maker and Nat Geo photographer, in addition to being a writer and speaker on all things inspirational. You can follow Pete’s work on his website. His focus is largely on the travel and environment.

Pete Mc Bride – Facebook –  Instagram

 

 

 

Tiffany Coates (World Motorcycle Tourer): Tiffany Coates is an inspiration to women the world over. Regardless of the terrain, Tiffany rides her heart out in conditions that would daunt the most adventurous riders.

Tiffany Coates :-Website – Blog – Facebook –  Twitter

Tiffany Coates (World Motorcycle Tourer)

 

 

 

Ewan McGregor (World Motorcycle Tourer): The famous actor and television producer is also a motorcycle tourer. His two movies – Long Way Round and Long Way Down are audacious on their attempt to document some of the longest rides ever.

Ewan McGregor : Instagram – Twitter

 

 

 

Eric Cedeno (Cyclist): Eric Cedeno instituted Bicycle Nomad with the intention of pursuing not just cycling, but also a cultural immersion. Through his cafe store, merchandise and dedicated documentation of his journeys, he inspires thousands to join him in to being nomads.

Eric Cedeno : Website – Facebook –Instagram 

 

 

 

Hubert Kriegel (World Traveller on a Sidecar)

Hubert Kriegel has been travelling the world ‘horizontally’ and ‘vertically’. This is the 12th year of the 10 years on road! His website is a must read for understanding how colossal sounding dreams can be achieved – simply by getting on to it.

Team Outdoor Travel Gear had a unique opportunity to track down Hubert when he was in India and spend quality time talking to him about his globe-trotting experiences –A day with Hubert Kreigel – The Timeless Ride

Hubert Kriegel – Website

 

 

 

Anders and Petra Stridfeldt (Biker Couple)

When their three sons moved out to do their own thing, Anders and Petra knew it was time to do theirs. So they sold their house and everything they owned, hopped on to their BMWs and started an epic tour round the world. They are an inspiration to many bikers around the world.

Anders Stridfeldt : Facebook –Instagram
Petra Stridfeldt: Facebook – Instagram – Twitter
Two Bikers One World : Website – Facebook


As you can see, the list of travellers and adventurers is immense… and growing! So whose name would you like to see on our next list?

OTG How to Pack a Backpack_Feature Image

How to pack your Backpack?!

Packing your backpack – How difficult can it be? We’re sure you’re asking yourselves right now whether you really need to know the RIGHT way to pack your backpack!

It IS pretty simple, but there is a technique to it. And once you get it right, you’ll notice the difference immediately!

A properly packed backpack, however heavy, will feel balanced and centered on your back. Nothing should be moving around inside and the weight needs to be evenly distributed.

Ideally, get acquainted with your backpack before leaving from home. Spread out everything you’ll be taking with you, use the right process to pack it and make a check list to ensure you haven’t forgotten anything.

When packing, we recommend using the following process. It is the most logical way to pack your backpack. The process focuses on optimizing the center of gravity of the backpack and ensures access to the most used items from your gear.

START PACKING FROM THE BOTTOM

Least Used Gear

OTG How to Pack a Backpack_Blog_Least Used Gear

Just like a building, a backpack packed with a solid sturdy foundation is a stable one.

Use the bottom of the backpack for gear that you won’t need throughout the day, till the time you camp at night.

Stash your sleeping bag, night clothes right at the bottom. If you’re going to be taking along items like an inflatable pillow, a sleeping bag liner etc., throw in those too at the bottom. If you use a carry mat that rolls up into a tiny shape that can fit into the bottom of your backpack, stuff that inside too.

Any other gear that you will need only after you’ve halted for the night, should go at the bottom, except for your torch or flashlight. Always keep your source of light handy and in a readily accessible place.

PACKING THE CORE

  1. Heavy Items
OTG How to Pack a Backpack_Blog_Heavy Items

So spend some time on this step and get it just right.

Usually, the items you place here will be things like rope, cookware, your food stash.

  1. Lighter Items
How to Pack a Backpack - Lighter Items

Next up, pack lighter and softer items around your heavy gear. This will make sure that the heavy gear is packed tightly and wont tumble around when you’re on the move. Use things like your clothes, jackets, tent body etc. for this purpose.

PACKING THE TOP AND PERIPHERY

Frequently Used Items

OTG How to Pack a Backpack_Blog_Frequently Used Items

Ideally liquids should be packed in external / side pockets to avoid any spills due to pressure of other items around it. If you’re carrying liquid fuel, to avoid a snafu in case of a spill, make sure the lid of the container is tightly secured.

Make use of daisy chains or loops on the exterior of your pack to attach gear that wont fit inside. There might be things like tent poles or carry mats, the dimensions of which are larger than those of your backpack. Take care to secure things tightly so they don’t snag on branches when you’re walking.

PRO TIPS

  • Try using pack dividers or smaller stuff sacks when packing things inside your backpack. This helps in dividing and better organizing your things and makes it easier to load and unload the backpack.
  • When stuffing gear at the bottom, make sure that it doesn’t catch on any aroma from your edibles. Also ensure against oil/liquid seeping into your sleeping bag, clothes etc. Not only will that spoil your gear, but it will also attract animals, insects at night; who’re very sensitive to smells. You don’t want them thinking you’re food!J
  • Always carry a rain cover for your backpack, even when you know it is not going to rain. A rain cover helps to protect the exterior of the backpack from the elements.
  • Know your weight carrying limit before you leave from home and make sure the weight of your backpack is a little lesser than that. If you have to buy some gear, food or other things during your trip, you don’t want your backpack to become heavier than what you can carry.

So that’s it then, the right way to pack your backpack! If you have some tips of your own that you picked up during your travels, then share them with us in the comments below.

Have an awesome adventure out there!

www.OutdoorTravelGear.com
#OutdoorTravelGear #GetOut #OTGadventure

Rishad Bhumgara - 2 stroke traveller - Mumbai Myanmar Mumbai - Yezdi - OutdoorTravel Gear

Meet Rishad Bhumgara – Guest OTG Blogger

Outdoor Travel Gear’s relationship with Rishad Bhumgara goes a long way…

Like really really long – even before the idea of Outdoor Travel Gear had taken shape in the brains of Jitesh Haria! Rishad has been a dear friend of Jitesh and Sagar Haria ever since the three were school going kids and they literally grew up together playing in their colony!

Those who know Rishad will swear that he is a hardcore long distance rider and a complete mad hatter at it! Recently, he successfully completed a solo ride from Mumbai to Myanmar and back; on his 30 years old Yezdi! And then he went on to swap his 30 year old 2 stroker with a 50 year old 2 stroker. We can safely foresee another epic ride in the making!

Rishad has been at Outdoor Travel Gear stores countless number of times and has been one of our early and long-standing customers. We invited him to be a guest blogger at OutdoorTravelGear.com’s blog and given a dear friend that he is, he obliged to share his views on his long association with us.

We thank Rishad for this wonderful gesture!

Rishad speaks:

“My association with Outdoor Travel Gear began before the brand itself was born. To me Outdoor Travel Gear isn’t a shop. It isn’t an eCommerce portal to buy adventure gear from.

Jitesh and Sagar lived and still live just 5 buildings away. We grew up falling down, bleeding, pulling each other’s legs, struggling through tuition and school and college (the last was a REAL struggle!!!). We grew up never knowing I’d ride a bike or that these pedigree gujju boys will turn entrepreneurs and in turn a source of amazing equipment for me and everyone. They began filling a gap. A gap that existed in India for a long time for the adventure junkie in us all. The gap of good, well reputed, high quality equipment.

 

Rishad Bhumgara - 2 stroke traveller - Mumbai Myanmar Mumbai - Yezdi – Outdoor Travel Gear - 1

They furthered their interests and those of other Indian manufacturers by becoming dealers for brands like Cramster, Dirtsack, Rynox and a few more. They brought these Indian made, world class products to our doorstep. Especially mine, since their first shop was 2 buildings behind mine. They started small, but strong and they were sure they’re in it for long.

Riding caught my fancy only after the Yezdi did. Trips in and around Mumbai were unparalleled adventures for me 8 years back. But they were also a major source of concern for my folks and Delzeen; my childhood sweetheart then, my wife and partner in crime now!

 

Rishad Bhumgara - 2 stroke traveller - Mumbai Myanmar Mumbai - Yezdi – Outdoor Travel Gear - 2

I’ve bought more from Outdoor Travel Gear than I actually remember. Lost a few, tore a few, broke some more, but each lasted their time and benefited me more ways that I would actually know.

My few major purchases have been expensive yet protective. Bulky yet light and most importantly put my loved ones at ease, that I’m as protected as can be.

My Cramster Jacket has been thru roughly and a minimum of 35,000km.

Returning from Bhutan, Near Nagpur, 900km from home I hit a stray dog. My jeans ripped and left my knees bleeding. But my Cramster jacket still shows the wounds I was spared. The Cramster Tundra gloves perished on that fall and I rode home with only a bloody knee. That one purchase saved me a lot of friction burns and unwarranted pain. Needless to say I replaced the gloves!!!!!

The Cramster Tank bag has been thru equal distances, held spares, towels, blankets and clothes and been a constant source of easy riding on small and big rides.

Over the course of 5-6 years I have harnessed down 100’s of kilos of riding essential with the Masterlock bungees, spider nets and ratchet systems. Some have perished mid ride, some still hang on for dear life and a few yet lie untouched; awaiting their turn to serve me, on my at times, absurd routes.

Other knickknacks I have bought in numbers I can’t remember but, Bear Grylls’ survival kit is yet untouched, and I intend to keep it that way. The LED lights hanging from the roof of my tent, or the Gerber hacking open a can of tuna for dinner or slicing immaculately through my bikes copper wires surely makes life easier on the road.

Certainly these products are built on years of the manufacturers experience and Outdoor Travel Gear is but only a store selling stuff. It’s almost all available online on theirs and other eCommerce sites, but I will have none of that. I still religiously visit their Bandra outlet before rides and just snoop around. Ask them questions, over and over again till I’m satisfied I’m buying the right thing. It’s their job to help and deliver and take onus of product quality. They have used most of the stuff, know their pros and would never hesitate to reveal their cons. They leave the decision making to you. But provide the much needed information to make a well informed purchase.

 

Rishad Bhumgara - 2 stroke traveller - Mumbai Myanmar Mumbai - Yezdi – Outdoor Travel Gear - 3

They aren’t your typical store after sales numbers and profits at any cost. They care and will understand that you embark to hostile terrains finding comfort in their products and that responsibility they uphold to the very best of their capabilities.”

 

Rishad’s blog – www.2stroketraveller.com

Rishad’s FB page – @2 stroke traveller

Rishad’s Instagram – @2_stroke_traveller

 

www.outdoortravelgear.com

 

 

 

Gear from OutdoorTravelGear.com to keep you Monsoon Ready

The Monsoon is here, and for those adventure enthusiasts out there, we know that the rainy season makes for larger, better, grander adventures than otherwise. While the rest of the world may curl up at home, in front of the TV sipping hot tea, we’re more likely to be outdoors – riding, hiking, trekking, travelling and generally doing our own thing!

We all know how inflicting rain gods can be in India and if we are not prepared for the deluge, our adventure can quickly turn from being fun to being a punishing ordeal. We believe it is imperative to take extra care of two important things around in the rains: Electronic devices, and yes, your clothing. That you need to protect your electronic devices from moisture is obvious, but don’t underestimate how miserable you can get if your socks and undergarments get wet either!

At OTG, we know the passion and excitement monsoon generates in us, so we’ve put together a unique monsoon collection for all adventure enthusiasts. Featured here are the must-have items from our Monsoon Collection, products that we promise will take your monsoon adventures from ‘great’ to ‘awesome’.

AQUAPAC Whanganui Cases

AQUAPAC makes some great waterproofing products. At the foremost this monsoon are the AQUAPAC Whanganui cases for all types and sizes of electronic equipment. Pick a suitable size for your device (from micro to large) and use it comfortably in the rain. The cases are guaranteed waterproof to the International Standard IPX8. This means that these are designed to not just keep out the rain but also to be submersible up to 15FT/5M under water for 30 minutes, while at the same time providing a good degree of touchscreen responsiveness through the plastic.

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MUC-OFF Screen Cleaning Kit

Despite case protection, electronic devices can get wet, especially when you finally take them out in the open. Moreover, moisture tends to get built up inside the case, due to the highlevels of humidity in the air. Screens turn streaky and unresponsive to touch with moisture, and can get scratches when you try to rub them clean. No more! Try MUC-OFF screen cleaning kit. It comes with its own microfiber cloth that is specially designed for cleaning those delicate finishing on screens. MUC-Off products are internationally revered for their ability to clean dirt, grime, fingertips and oily residue. Now try it on your electronic devices.

Pro Tip: Throw in a moisture absorbent sachet into your case. You can easily buy these or sometimes even get them when you buy branded shoes or winter clothing.

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AQUAPAC Dry Bags

Dry Bags from AQUAPAC come in wide ranging sizes from 2-70 litres and are an excellent option for monsoon. These come in many colours, making it easy to colour code your stuff. Divide up your clothes or essentials into sets/categories and place them in bags for easy access. Imagine that you’re camping and you only need to retrieve a phone charger. Now it would be literally a nightmare to access the tiny thing that has slipped at the bottom of a large knapsack inside a tent. It is much easier to access stuff kept in colour coded smaller bags. They also have some brilliant innovations in design – like having handles at both ends so you can grab and pull, however you’ve placed them originally. These Drybags have international waterproofing standard of IPX6, which indicates that these bags protect against heavy seas / temporary flooding. These are great for heavy rains, but are not submersible.

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And now for what you should be wearing..

MOTOTECH Hurricane Rain Jacket

This Mototech Jacket has the admirable advantage of not just being backed by Mototech’s high-quality production values, but also being designed in wonderfully lightweight and compact manner. Any trekker or biker knows the pain of having to pack heavy rain gear with them that they’ve to lug all over the place. Mototech solves the problem, and also throws in a few nice touches of their own, like making the drawstring cords high-viz, fully taped seams and having Velcro and flaps in the front instead of zippers (zippers tend to let water and wind in, and over time, they do tend to stick a little). The fabric used for the jacket is super tough and durable making it a must have for your monsoon rides or hikes.

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QUIPCO Flash Hi Viz Suspenders

Quipco is a popular brand among the outdoors community for their stylish, yet functional products. This product from the Quipco stable stands out as a monsoon must-have. When it’s raining, water running of windshields and visors obscure vision to such an extent that there is real danger on the roads. These high-viz suspenders have a universal size and are wearable on anything you have worn which allows people to see you on the road from a distance. A great investment in your safety whether you are riding a bike or cycling or simply walking along.

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BONUS: AQUAPAC Puncture Patches

No list of monsoon gear is complete without mentioning these great little puncture patches, again from the house of Aquapac. These small patches seal off tears, rips and holes in almost anything – jackets, aquapacs, bags, tents, rainwear, seams of clothing and much else. Their utility is tremendous since they prevent leaks and stop rips and tears from spreading. Carry a set with you for emergency use anywhere.

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There’s a lot more stuff at our store that you might find useful during the monsoon. These are only our top-of-the-draw picks. Why don’t you head here and check out what else you would use during this rainy season?

Keep Your Stuff Dry With Aquapac Waterproof Bags and Cases

It’s not only your skin and hair that need care during the messy monsoon but so do your backpacks. Commuting in the rain can cause a mess of you and your bag. Not to forget the accessories and your vital electronic gadgets that cost you a fortune. Most of the time we buy the wrong backpack and spend a small fortune and most of these backpacks don’t even survive the rains.

Aquapac not only protects your gear against water but other elements like dust and sand and moisture. Aquapac products are made from 100% PVC-free material, mostly plastics which make them rustproof and surprisingly lightweight. These materials include TPU, ABS, nylon and polypropylene which are light and easily accessible.

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Aquapac gives us a fully-featured backpack which comes in 15L, 25L and 35L capacity and is ideal to commute, trek, camp or tour anywhere. The backpack also comes with an external mesh pocket to hold a 2L water bottle.

The bag is large enough to cart your laptop, camera, a small meal and a pair of clothes. The bag’s inbuilt partition allows one to store wet and dry clothing separately, hence the name Wet & Dry. Each strap of the bag comes with a lash tab which can be easily anchored almost anywhere. Aquapac supplies tested products which meet international waterproofing standards of up to 5metres under water. With a five year guarantee exclusive to animal attacks the bags can function at temperatures down to -40C.

Some additional features which no other bag except Aquapac offers, are as follows:
• Key pocket: The backpack comes with a key pocket so that you don’t have to dig inside the pack.
• Internal pockets in yellow: This helps to see the bottom of the bag easily.
• Reflective logo print: This helps you to be seen at night with reflective ink
• TPU-coated fabric with taped seams: Keep it in the rain for days and water won’t seep in through the seams
• Roll-seal: The roll seal is fantastically designed and can provide quick access to your belongings with ease, preventing water seepage.
• Removable back support/seat: This back support is removable and when wet can be dried and installed back without a struggle. Also the back support can be used to sit on anywhere in the wilderness.
• Sternum and waist straps: When you’re on the move the backpack securely remains in place. Moreover the waist straps can be removed if you don’t need them.
• External mesh-pockets: These pockets can be used to keep anything that’s the size of a bottle.
• Integral light-lash: you can add a light to your back which could come handy.

Now that we have found a solution for your bag and equipment, what about your mobile phone? It might stay safe in the backpack, but it would be a pain to halt and undo your bag to attend phones calls, take pictures etc. Aquapac also manufactures cases for handheld devices that prove to be lifesavers.

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The Aquapac mini and large cases are named after the Whanganui River in the North Island of New Zealand. They can be used to store mobile phones, Ipads, tablets, first aid and other travel essentials. These cases are ideal to protect your phone from dust, sand and water, moisture.

With these cases you won’t hesitate to remove your costly smartphone in the middle of a river jiggling to balance with butter fingers. You can simply slide your phone in one of these cases and use it without worrying about the weather. The Aquapac Mini Whanganui can fit your iPhone, blackberries, android phones and even your small gps units.

Besides the mini Aquapac also builds large Whanganui which offers more room to store and completely submersible. The case comes with an adjustable shoulder strap or which can be worn around your neck for added safety. The high frequency welded seams makes the case floats on water if you happen to drop. Whanganui are made from Polyurethane (PU) – 100% recyclable, thinner. This material stays flexible when it’s chilly, easier to operate equipment inside the cases. The clear material allows you to see everything that’s inside. The Aquapac comes along with ‘aquaclip’ which holds the bag together. It also consists of a spring loaded slider in the centre to adjust the length of the space available to put your stuff.

So there it is then. Equip yourself with the Aquapac waterproof backpack and phone case, and step out there with the confidence that your stuff is going to stay completely dry.

To see the complete range of Aquapac products available with Outdoor Travel Gear, visit http://www.outdoortravelgear.com/brand/aquapac

If you’ve used Aquapac products,we’d love to know your experience, in the comments below. Also, don’t hesitate to write in with your questions or enquiries.

http://www.OutdoorTravelGear.com

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